Community Medicine

Department of Community Medicine

Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital
Kalitheerthalkuppam, Madagedipeth, Puducherry – 605107
Annual Report
(2010-2011)

CM-1.jpg

www.smvmch.ac.in
Phone: 0413 – 2643000, 2643031
Fax: 0413 – 2643014
Email: smvmch@sify.com

Epidemiological unit

It is led by a teaching faculty and a trained bio-statistician in the department. We have a couple of computers and basic software programs such as Epi info, Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS), and WHO Anthro for quantitative data analysis and Atlas-ti (demo version) for qualitative data analysis installed in it.

This unit plays a key role in day to day data management. It monitors and ensures the daily entry of data collected during passive epidemiological surveillance in our hospital and the data collected during routine field based clinics. This information helps us to initiate preventive measures in the given locality. All internship monitoring formats are entered and stored in electronic formats. The monthly RHTC and UHTC reports are entered and processed here. This unit is active in educating post-graduates, medical students and interns on use of free public health software - Epi_info.

We have entered and analyzed survey data of 1800 elderly subjects in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. It was a large community-based survey for evaluation of community-managed palliative care program run by HelpAge, India. In future, we envision developing this centre for ensuring better technical support to our post-graduate students, medical students and teaching faculties of SMVMCH.

CMF-1.jpg

Elderly clinic at HelpAge, India

In December 2011, we have extended our partnership with HelpAge, India from research activities to service provision. Under this, fortnightly we are conducting health clinic at elderly village of HelpAge, India at Tamaraikulam, Cuddalore. Our post-graduate, a teaching faculty and medical intern conducts this clinics and offer their medical advice and care. We have started using standard screening tool to identify the health needs of the patient and plan care for the patient. So far, we have conducted four clinics with approximately 15 to 20 patients per clinic. Clinic is held every first and third Saturday at elderly village at Tamaraikulam, Cuddalore

We have supported HelpAge India in conducting health camps for elderly in cyclone affected villages. The post cyclone activity went on for four days. Each day our team covered two villages offering medical care to approximately 400 patients.

CMF-2.jpg

Support to HelpAge, India

A team of teaching faculty, post-graduate and medical interns of SMVMCH supported the field-based mobile clinics for elderly in cyclone hit villages in Pondicherry.

Passive Epidemiological Surveillance

Since last two years, we are conducting routine passive epidemiological surveillance in our hospital. Every day, medical interns posted in Department of Community Medicine pay visit to hospital wards of SMVMCH and note down the socio-demographic details, date of onset, laboratory findings and status of confirmed diagnosis of enlisted infectious disease conditions among the admitted patients. We report the cases of Malaria, Cholera and Acute Flaccid Paralysis to the District Health System. Based on this data, we have recently investigated the reasons for high number of enteric fever cases in the last two subsequent years.

Disease conditions covered under ‘passive epidemiological surveillance’

No Early warning sign or symptoms Disease condition
1 Acute flaccid paralysis Polio
2 Fever with rash Chicken pox, Measles
3 Fever with chills Malaria
4 Fever with altered sensorium or convulsions Japanese encephalitis, Meningitis
5 Fever with bleeding from skin\ mucus membrane Dengue Hemorrhagic fever
6 Fever with jaundice Hepatitis A or C
7 Fever Do follow up to rule out diagnosis number
2,3,4,5
8 Acute watery diarrhea Cholera, Tetanus, Diphtheria

Distribution of suspected infectious disease conditions admitted in the hospital in last two years

Suspected infectious disease conditions No. of cases, 2010 No. of cases, 2011
Acute flaccid paralysis 2(0.3) 3(0.2)
Fever with rash 2(0.3) 4(0.3)
Fever with chills 7(1.2) 44(3.4)
Fever with bleeding from skin or mucus membrane 1(0.2) 1(0.1)
Fever with jaundice 8(1.4) 2(0.2)
Fever 456(77.3) 953(73.6)
Acute water diarrhea 114(19.3) 288(22.2)
Total/td> 592 1295

Departmental Activities

  • Undergraduate teaching
  • Postgraduate teaching
  • Epidemiological unit
  • Geriatric clinic

Undergraduate teaching:

Our undergraduate teaching aims to make a complete primary care physician. We follow the norms set by the Medical Council of India and the Pondicherry University. We are in process to develop community oriented undergraduate teaching and to make it relevant to the local health needs. Since last two years, medical undergraduates are exposed to ‘hands-on training program on community based research’ and undergraduates are currently motivated to undertake problem-solving community-based projects and participate in national health program activities.

Apart from didactic lecture sessions and community exposure visits, we facilitate ‘small group’ interactive teaching sessions, to maximize learning on the topics which are relevant to public health problems in India and their university assessment plan. We have communicated our best teaching practices and innovations in the scientific journals of International level. We are developing a program for community-based teaching for medical undergraduates. Such activities are often seen as a challenge due to constraints such as lack of commitment at various levels, shortage of trained manpower and institutional support. We look forward to its successful implementation and its mainstreaming in our routine teaching activities.

We have also introduced a project based learning system, where undergraduates are motivated to take up research projects. They plan, execute and present the entire research project on their own, with the help of faculties who play the role of facilitators.

On-going plan of sessions for medical undergraduates
Semester Morning hours activities Afternoon hours activities
I and II Foundation program for UGs
Theory, Exposure visits
Sessions on communication skills
III (Clinical posting)
Diet survey, Community-based Medical Education
Exposure Health Care System
Theory
IV (Clinical posting)
Project-based learning
Exposure visits
Theory
V - Theory
VI - Theory
VII - Theory
Small group teaching
Practical sessions
- Theory
Practical sessions
Success of undergraduates in final university assessment over the period of three years
Batch year No. appeared No passed No. of distinctions
2006 112 112 (100) 20
2007 123 121 (98) 12
2008 101 96(97) 6
2009 125 120(96) 12
2010 108 101(93) 6
2011 119 119(100) 36

Figures in parenthesis are percentages

Post-graduate (PG) teaching and exposure

We expect post-graduate candidates to ‘learn by doing’ and become competent to work in teaching and research institutes, and in services of government and voluntary health sectors. Yearly, we admit three post-graduates in Community Medicine. They are exposed to outcome oriented program over the period of three years. Apart from their hands-on exposure in Rural Health Training Centre and Urban Health Training Centre, they are posted at a Primary Health Centre where they get exposure to understand the functions and working of peripheral government health-care system.

We have developed a strategic partnership with HelpAge India, which is the recognized national level voluntary body with a mission to work for the cause and care of disadvantaged aged persons and improve their quality of life. Our PGs are actively involved in the field activities of HelpAge, India.

An online group has been started within the department to facilitate e-based learning, to increase the interaction among post-graduate students and faculty regarding various topics of academic importance and to provide an additional platform to the post-graduate students for learning and sharing their views and opinions. Post-graduate students, faculty from the department and experts in the subject from other colleges and organizations are the members of this group.

The progress of PG’s are monitored through log books. Their performance in academic activities such as journal clubs and seminar presentations are monitored and immediate feedback is ensured.

Dissertation topics and name of the post-graduate students for year 2013-16
Conferences and workshop attended by Post-graduates (Jan- Dec 2013)
Title of dissertation Name of candidate
Acute Childhood Morbidities: Determinants and Household
practices in villages of Rural Health Training Centre,
Thiruvanainallur (Funding Organization: ICMR)
Dr.M.R.Thirunavukarasu
An Epidemiological study on alcohol user in rural Pondicherry Dr.V.Vijayaramanan
Active case finding of Tuberculosis among household contacts
(Funding Organization: ORPG RNTCP)
Dr.V.Anand Kumar
Epidemiology of Dementia and Caregivers’ Perspectives in
field care villages of Rural Health Training Centre,
Thiruvanainallur
Dr.J.Gurukarthick
An interventional study effectiveness of school health
education in improving personal hygiene, nutritional status and
reducing morbidities among school children (6-14 years) in
Puducherry
Dr.R.Muruganandham
To evaluate the reasons for Initial and Diagnostic default from
treatment in Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Puducherry
Dr.V.S.Venkatesh kumar
Perception and Determinants of pain among elderly in
surrounding villages of Rural Health Centre, Thiruvennainallur
Dr.S.Kirubkaaran
A study on psychiatric morbidity in relation to substance abuse
among adults 15 years and above in Pondicherry
Dr.J.Sahithyaa
Sources of previous Tuberculosis drug exposure for patients
registered as Re-Treatment tuberculosis under RNTCP in
Puducherry Tuberculosis unit.
Dr.V.Karthikeyan
Paper presentation
in national conferences
Paper presentation
in state conferences
Workshops Papers
published
Papers
submitted
III yr PGs
Dr.M.R.Thirunavukarasu 1 1 9 0 2
Dr.V.Vijayaramanan 1 1 4 0 1
Dr.V.Anand Kumar 1 1 6 1 0
II yr PGs
Dr.J.GuruKarthick 2 1 5 1 0
Dr.R.Muruganandham 2 1 5 0 1
Dr.V.S.Venkatesh kumar 1 1 3 0 0
I yr PGs
Dr.S.Kirubkaaran 0 0 3 0 0
Dr.J.Sahithyaa 0 0 2 0 0
Dr.V.Karthikeyan 0 0 3 0 0
Special Sessions for Post Graduates
Title of dissertation Name of candidate
Acute Childhood Morbidities: Determinants and Household
practices in villages of Rural Health Training Centre,
Thiruvanainallur (Funding Organization: ICMR)
Dr.M.R.Thirunavukarasu
An Epidemiological study on alcohol user in rural Pondicherry Dr.V.Vijayaramanan
Active case finding of Tuberculosis among household contacts
(Funding Organization: ORPG RNTCP)
Dr.V.Anand Kumar
Epidemiology of Dementia and Caregivers’ Perspectives in
field care villages of Rural Health Training Centre,
Thiruvanainallur
Dr.J.Gurukarthick
An interventional study effectiveness of school health
education in improving personal hygiene, nutritional status and
reducing morbidities among school children (6-14 years) in Puducherry
Dr.R.Muruganandham
To evaluate the reasons for Initial and Diagnostic default from
treatment in Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Puducherry
Dr.V.S.Venkatesh kumar
Perception and Determinants of pain among elderly in
surrounding villages of Rural Health Centre, Thiruvennainallur
Dr.S.Kirubkaaran
A study on psychiatric morbidity in relation to substance abuse
among adults 15 years and above in Pondicherry
Dr.J.Sahithyaa
Sources of previous Tuberculosis drug exposure for patients
registered as Re-Treatment tuberculosis under RNTCP in
Puducherry Tuberculosis unit.
Dr.V.Karthikeyan
Conferences and workshop attended by Post-graduates (Jan- Dec 2013)
Paper
presentation
in national
conferences
Paper
presentation
in state
conference
Workshops Papers
published
Papers
submitted
III yr PGs
Dr.M.R.Thirunavukarasu 1 1 9 0 2
Dr.V.Vijayaramanan 1 1 4 0 1
Dr.V.Anand Kumar 1 1 6 1 0
II yr PGs
Dr.J.GuruKarthick 2 1 5 1 0
Dr.R.Muruganandham 2 1 5 0 1
Dr.V.S.Venkatesh kumar 1 1 3 0 0
I yr PGs
Dr.S.Kirubkaaran 0 0 3 0 0
Dr.J.Sahithyaa 0 0 2 0 0
Dr.V.Karthikeyan 0 0 3 0 0
Special Sessions for Post Graduates
S.No. Date Topics
1 6 Jun 2013 Ecological studies, RCT
2 14 Jun 2013 Case control study
3 20 Jun 2013 Cohort study
4 25 Jun 2013 Biases
5 07 Jul 2013 Association and causation
6 10 Jul 2013 Measurement of disease
7 18 Jul 2013 Workshop on SPSS Software Package
8 21 Jul 2013 Measures of association
9 July 2013 Online course on Social Epidemiology
10 6 Oct 2013 Demography
11 13 Nov 2013 NCD and tobacco cessation
12 12 Nov 2013 RTI/STD
13 14, 15 December, 2013 IMNCI sessions at RHTC with hands-on in field
Activity (June 2013): Microteaching sessions for PGs

Post-graduates from the department of community medicine were trained in the basic epidemiology and teaching-learning methods during this month in the interactive sessions planned and conducted by the faculties from the department for the duration of 32 hours.

With a view envisioned towards acquiring skills in application of teaching-learning methods, a workshop was planned and conducted on 27th June on ‘Basic epidemiology’ to assess the cognitive domain of PG students and to strengthen experimental learning among them. This hands-on exposure of conducting workshop was followed by a qualitative interview of presenter PG’s to obtain a feedback of their self-reflection. Feedback from the participants of this workshop was also obtained and analyzed. Overall exercise proved to be a fruitful venture in inculcating the skills of session planning and session delivery among post-graduate students and self-reflection helped them to identify their strengths and limitations.

Table: Workshops Conducted by Post Graduates for Medical Interns
S.No. Date Topics
1 27.6.13 Workshop on Observational Epidemiological Studies
2 12.11.13 Workshop on Management of Reproductive Tract Infection and Sexually Transmitted Infection
3 19.11.13 Workshop on Management of Non-Communicable Diseases
4 10.12.13 Workshop on Tobacco Cessation
Epidemiological unit

The epidemiology unit is led by a teaching faculty and a trained bio-statistician in the department. We have a couple of computers and basic software programs such as Epi-info, Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS), and WHO- Anthro for quantitative data and Atlas-ti (demo version) for qualitative data installed in it.

This unit plays a key role in day to day data management. It monitors and ensures the daily entry of data collected during passive epidemiological surveillance in our hospital and the data collected during routine field based clinics. This information helps us to initiate preventive measures in the given locality. All internship monitoring formats are entered and stored in electronic formats. The monthly RHTC and UHTC reports are entered and processed here. This unit is active in educating post-graduates, medical students and interns on use of free public health software Epi-info.

Geriatric clinic at HelpAge India

In December 2011, we have extended our partnership with HelpAge, India from research activities to service provision. Under this, fortnightly we are conducting health clinic at elderly village of HelpAge, India at Tamaraikulam, Cuddalore. Our post-graduate, a teaching faculty and medical intern conducts this clinics and offer their medical advice and care. We have started using standard screening tool to identify the health needs of the patient and plan care for the patient. So far, we have conducted four clinics with approximately 15 to 20 patients per clinic. Clinic is held every first and third Saturday at elderly village at Tamaraikulam, Cuddalore.

We have supported HelpAge India in conducting health camps for elderly in cyclone affected villages. The post cyclone activity went on for four days. Each day our team covered two villages offering medical care to approximately 400 patients.

Activity We provided onsite medical team for the Walkathon for elderly organized by HelpAge India on June 15th, 2013. Faculty and post-graduates from the department participated with full enthusiasm in it.

Inauguration function of ‘Walk against elder abuse’ by HelpAge India at Pondicherry beach

Assessment of medical interns (2007 batch) posting at the Department of Community Medicine
Indicators Urban Health Centre(111) Primary Health Centre(113) Rural Health Centre(113)
Total number of
patients seen (Mean ± SD)
161.14 ± 111.54 281.14 ± 124.27 468.18 ± 173.1
Total number of
patients Treated (Mean ± SD)
129.77 ± 74.04 268.85 ± 113.15 438 ± 170.10
Patients referred (Mean ± SD) 8.82 + 11.78 10.0 + 9.5 22.79 + 17.95
Type of operative procedure
Suturing 0(0) 82(72.57) 50(44.25)
Clean and dressing 0(0) 42(37.2) 48(42.19)
Foreign body(eye) 0(0) 1(0.8) 0(0)
Foreign body (ear) 0(0) 1(0.8) 1(0.89)
Cataract surgery 0(0) 10(8.85) 0(0)
trauma 0(0) 0(0) 46(40.71)
Health education in
school and community
40(36.04) 40(35.4) 74(66.37)
Involvement in survey
and project activity
9(8.11) 11(9.7) 15(13.27)
Adolescent clinic 8(7.2) 0(0) 0(0)
MCH Services
ANC care 0(0) 0(0) 0(0)
PNC care 0(0) 0(0) 0(0)
TT Immunization 0(0) 69(61.06) 0(0)
Deliveries 0(0) 0(0) 0(0)
Immunization
BCG 0(0) 14(12.3) 0(0)
DPT 0(0) 41(36.28) 0(0)
OPV 0(0) 62(54.87) 0(0)
Measles &Vitamin A 0(0) 25(22.12) 0(0)
Other injection 0(0) 17(15.04) 0(0)
Epidemiological
surveillance
75(67.57) 0(0) 0(0)

Undergraduate teaching

Our undergraduate teaching aims to make competent primary care physician. We follow the norms set by the Medical Council of India and the Pondicherry University. We are in process to develop community oriented undergraduate teaching and to make it relevant to local health needs. Last year, we have developed a ‘hands-on training program on community-based research’ for medical undergraduates and currently we are motivating undergraduates to undertake problem-solving community-based projects and to participate in national health program activities.

Apart from didactic lecture sessions and community exposure visits, we facilitate ‘small group’ interactive teaching to maximize learning on the topics which are relevant to public health problems in India and their university assessment plan. We have communicated our best teaching practices and innovations in the scientific journals of International level. We are developing a program for community-based teaching for medical undergraduates. Such activities are often seen as a challenge due to constraints such as lack of commitment at various levels, shortage of trained manpower and institutional support. We look forward to its successful implementation and its mainstreaming in our routine teaching activities.

On-going plan of sessions for medical undergraduates
Semester Morning hours activities Afternoon hours activities
I and II Theory
Exposure visits
Sessions on communication skills
III (Clinical posting)
Diet survey
Exposure visits to Primary Health Centre
Sub-centre, Anganwadi centre
Theory
Sessions on Research Methods
(Problem Solving for Better Health)
IV (Clinical posting)
Project-based learning
Exposure visits
Theory
V - Theory
VI - Theory
VII (Clinical posting)
Clinico-social case discussion
Epidemiological problems
Theory
Practical sessions
Success of undergraduates in final university assessment over the period of three years
Year No. appeared No passed No. of distinctions
2006 112 112 (100) 20
2007 123 121 (98) 12
2008 101 96(97) 6

CMDA-1.jpg

CMDA-2.jpg

Mass Drug Administration (MDA) for elimination of Filaria – A National Health Program activity

Post-graduate (PG) teaching and exposure

We expect post-graduate candidates to ‘learn by doing’ and become competent to work in teaching and research institutes, and in services of government and voluntary health sectors. Yearly, we admit three post-graduates in Community Medicine. They are exposed to outcome oriented program over the period of three years. Apart from their hands-on exposure to Rural Health Training Centre and Urban Health Training Centre, they are posted at a Primary Health Centre where they get exposure to understand the functions and working of peripheral government health care system.

We have developed a strategic partnership with HelpAge India, which is a recognized national level voluntary body with a mission to work for the cause and care of disadvantaged aged persons and improve their quality of life. Our PGs are actively involved in the field activities of HelpAge, India. The progresses of PGs are monitored through log books. Their performance in academic activities such as journal clubs and seminar presentations are monitored and immediate feedback is ensured.

Dissertation topics and name of the Post-graduate students
Title of dissertation Name of candidate
Acute childhood morbidities: determinants and
household practices in surrounding villages of our
Rural Health Training centre
Dr M. R. Thirunavukarasu
An epidemiological study on alcohol user in rural Pondicherry Dr V. Vijayaramanan
Active case finding of Tuberculosis among household contacts Dr. V. Anand Kumar

CMDA-3.jpg

Post-graduates at a workshop on ‘Qualitative Research Methods’ at MGIMS, Sewagram

Workshops and Training programs organized by the Department

S.No. Title Date and year Participants
1 Workshop on basics of educational project development 23 November 2012 18
2 Workshop on Qualitative Methods in Health Research 7-11 January, 2013 22
3 Training on “Guidelines of RNTCP” for CRRI’s 19- 20 April, 2013 14
4 Workshop on Epi _info software program 16-17 May, 2013 22
5 Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research 23 May, 2013 21
6 Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates 2 – 4July, 2013 43
7 Workshop on Survival Analysis 19-20 August, 2013 21
Workshop on basics of educational project development, 23 November 2012

The department of community medicine organized and conducted a workshop on Workshop on basics of educational project development on 23 November 2012. The workshop was designed for faculties with the objective to make the participants aware of the basics of educational project development and the opportunities available (Fellowship, Distance learning) for their professional development. The workshop had 18 participants from various departments. The programme schedule is given below.

Time Topics Faculty
9.30-10.00 Introduction to workshop Mahalakshmy, Amol
10.00-10.45 Educational projects – why? Focus of the project? Amol
10.45-11.30 Team building for educational projects Kalai, Mahalakshmy
11.30-11-45 Tea break
11.45-12.15 Methods used in educational projects – Qualitative,
Quantitative and Mixed Methods
Amol, Mahalakshmy, Kalai
12.15-1.00 Tools for measurement – Steps in questionnaire
development, standard scales
Amol, Mahalakshmy, Kalai
1.00-2.00 Lunch break
2.00-2.30 Ethical issues in educational projects Mahalakshmy
2.30-3.00 Developing an educational scholarship – Publications, Fellowships Amol
3.00-3.30* Distance learning for personal professional
development
Amol
3.30-4.00 Thanks, Feedback, Group photo All
Workshop on Qualitative Methods in Health Research 7-11 January 2013

Since last five years, we have been supporting and organizing four and half day residential workshops on qualitative research methods for young health professionals in India. Two sessions were held at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram, Wardha and three sessions were held at our department. Our workshop curriculum content is blended with participatory, in-depth and systematic techniques of qualitative methods. It offers hands-on experience on manual content analysis and software-aided analysis of qualitative data. The workshop curriculum is based on our previous experience and participants’ feedback.

A workshop was held at Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Pondicherry from 7th January to 11th January. The workshop had 22 participants from various parts of the country.

Session Plans for workshop on Qualitative Research Methods
Time 7 January
Monday
8 January
Tuesday
9 January
Wednesday
10 January
Thursday
11 January
Friday
9.00-9.30 Welcome,and
Introduction
Re-cap of day
one
Re-cap of day
two
Re-cap of day
three
Re-cap of day
four
9.30-10.00 Starting the
Journey –Ground rules
Free listing exercise Focus Group
Discussion
(FGD)
Basic terms
used in QDA
analysis
Ethical issues
in qualitative
research
10.00-10.30 Tea Break
10.30-11.00 Introduction to
Qualitative
Research
Introduction to Anthropac Focus Group
Discussion
Game:Playing with
Candies
How should one
report qualitative
research?
11.00-11.30 Whose reality
count? (Film)
Demo on free
listing
Demo on FGD Instructions for
manual content
analysis
Experience
sharing and
Closing
11.30-12.00 Exercise and
practice on
free listing
Individual
work on FGD
Participants
apply lessons
learned to content
analysis of transcripts
Retro-pre
feedback
12.00-1.00 What is Participatory
Research? Tools?
(PPT, Film)
Sharing of individual work
1.00-2.00 Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
2.00-3.00 Hands-on Pile sorting
exercise
Key Informant
Interview (KII)
Atlas-ti – Use
in content analysis
3.00-3.15 Tea Tea Tea Tea
3.15 – 4.00 Other tools
(Demo-case studies)
Exercise and
practice on pile sort
In-depth Interview
(IDI)
Sampling in
qualitative research
4.00-4.15 Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback
Introduction

The training program was held on 19thand 20th April, 2013 as per the schedule the Seminar hall of Department of Community Medicine, SMVMCH, Pondicherry, with emphasis on the following section,

Section 1: Ensuring Identification of TB suspects

Section 2: Collecting sputum from TB suspect and staining

Section 3: Categorization of TB patient and referral system

Section 4: Safe Disposal of contaminated material

Sl.No. Program Time
Day-1 (Afternoon)
1 Session 1: Pre-test and Introduction 2.30 pm - 2.45 pm
2 Session 2 : Problem statement 2.45 pm - 3.00 pm
3 Session 3: Structure of RNTCP /Role of medical
colleges / Referral system / Newer developments
3.00 pm - 3.15 pm
4 Session 4: Ensuring Identification of TB suspects 3.15 pm - 3.45 pm
5 Session 5: Collecting sputum from TB suspect and staining 3.45 pm - 4.15 pm
Day-2 (Morning)
6 Session6: Hands on Training on AFB staining 9.00 am - 9.30 am
7 Session 7: Visit to DMC 9.30 am - 10.00 am
Tea break
8 Session 8: Hands on diagnosis using X-rays 10.15 am - 10.45 am
9 Session 9: Categorization of TB patient 10.45am - 11.45 am
10 Session 10: Drug resistance TB 11.45am - 12.00 pm
11 Session 11: Monitoring of drug administration 12.00 pm - 12.30 pm
12 Session 12: Safe disposal of contaminated material 12.30 pm - 12.45 pm
13 Session 13: Post-test & Feedback 12.45pm - 1.00 pm

Lesson plan was worked on for the activities related to RNTCP with emphasis on interactive lecture sections, demonstration, hands on training (to fill up sputum form, Lab register and treatment card and AFB staining of Tubercle bacilli , diagnosis using X ray) , group work for case based learning and discussion. To maximize the learning by interactive section 20 interns posted in community medicine were included for training (subsequently other interns will be trained in batches). Pre –test and post- test feedback was obtained.

Acknowledgement

To Government Chest Clinic, Puducherry and Mission Director, PSHM.

A workshop was held by the Epidemiology unit on 16th and 17th May 2013. The participants were 10 teaching faculties and 7 post-graduates from various departments of SMVMCH, Pondicherry. The workshop participants were registered on the first-come-first-serve basis. The resource persons were two trained community medicine teaching faculties and the Biostatistician in the department. Session plan for the workshop is given below.

Time Day 1 (16 May) Day 2 (17 May)
9.00-9.30 Welcome, and Starting up with the session Re-cap of day one
9.30 - 10.30 Introduction to EPI Data entry
10.30 -1.00 Tea Tea
11.00 –2.00 Make View Hands on – Data entry
12.00 - 1.00 Make View - hands on Analysis
1.00-2.00 Lunch Lunch
2.00-3.00 Creating Check codes, commands Analysis – hands on
3.00-3.15 Tea Tea
3.15 – 4.00 Check codes – hands on Interactions with facilitators and solving queries
4.00-4.15 Feedback Feedback

Overall, the consensuses for all the sessions were good. There was significant improvement in participants’ skills in entering and analyzing data using statistical software. As perceived by the workshop participants, the workshop was helpful for the students and faculty and more such workshops were expected in near future with added emphasis on hands on sessions and data analysis

Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research (23 May, 2013)

A workshop was organized and conducted by the Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital on ‘Ethics in Research’. Dr Geetanjali Batnamabane and Dr. Raveendran, two distinguished professors of Pharmacology from Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Post-graduate Medicine and Research (JIPMER), were the guest speakers for the workshop. Dr. Amol R. Dongre, Professor and Head, Dept. of Community Medicine, SMVMCH spoke on Ethical issues in qualitative research. 21 faculty members from SMVMCH were the participants for this workshop. The overall program of this one day workshop was as follows:

Time Topics/activity Facilitators
9.30-9.45 Welcome and Introduction of resource persons and participants Amol
9.45-10.00 A film on ethics in research -
10.00-10.15 Reflection of audience on film Kalai, Amol
10.15 – 10.30 Tea break
10.30 – 11.30 General ethical issues in human studies DrGitanjali, JIPMER
11.30 – 11.45 Open forum
11.45-12.30 General ethical issues in animal experiments Dr R Raveendran, JIPMER
12.30- 12.45 Open forum
12.45-1.00 Ethical issues in qualitative research Amol
1.00 – 1.15 Thanks to resource persons and participants Abhishek
1.15 – 2.00 Lunch
2.00 – 4.15 Wit – Movie (basement auditorium) All faculties, students, PGs and Interns
Orientation Workshop on Research Methods - first year Post-graduates(July 2 – 4, 2013)

Orientation Workshop was conducted for the newly joined batch of post-graduates from pre-clinical, para-clinical and clinical subjects for the year 2013. Full day sessions over a period of three days from 2 nd July to 4th July 2013 were conducted for sensitizing the new post-graduates on research methods. There were 43 participants and the sessions were interactive and participatory in nature. The sessions were conducted by five faculties from the department of community medicine. Dean (Academic) and Professor of Forensic Medicine, Dr. R. Kagne sensitized the participants on medico-legal issues in medical research. Dr. Jafrin from department of Pharmacology talked on ‘Animal Experiments’. The program of this workshop is given below:

Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates
Time (IST) 2 July, 2013 3 July, 2013 4 July, 2013
9.00 – 9.30 Starting the Journey and
ground rules
Recap of day 1 Recap of day 2
9.30-10.00 Quantitative Research Methods -
Universe, sample and sampling (Amol)
Group refine their
project after literature
review
Biases - Identify
potential biases in your
group project (Dr Suguna)
10.00-10.30 Tea Break
10.30- 11.00 Sample size and
sampling
(Amol)
(A brief introduction
to variables and its
types)

Designing a
questionnaire –
Groups work on their
questionnaire


Pre-testing


Copyright issues
(Amol, Dr Kalai,
Dr Murugan and
Dr Suguna)

Analysis plan (Dr Kalai)
11.00 -11.30 Observational study
designs (Amol)
How to cite
references? (Dr Arun)
11.30-12.00 How to develop thesis
proposals? Gant Chart
(Dr Kalai)
12.00 -12.30 Experimental study
designs – Randomization,
blinding, GCP
(Dr Suguna)
Common mistakes and
malpractices in research
(Amol)
12.30-1.00 Qualitative Research
Methods43
(Amol)
Standard Operating
Procedure(SOP)
of the
Research Committee at
SMVMCH (Amol)
1.00 -2.00 Lunch Lunch Lunch
2.00-2.30 Animal experiments
(DrJafrin)
Ethics in Research
(Film)
Professionalism and
ethics – (Movie)

Medico-legal issues –
(DrKagne)

2.30-3.00 Group work –participants
will design a cross
sectional study
12 General Principles –
ICMR Guidelines
(Amol)
3.00-3.30 Presentation of group work Informed consent
Form (Dr Murugan)
3.30-4.15 How to select the research
topic? Searching the
literature – selecting and
refining the research
question (Home work on literature search)
(Amol and Dr Kalai)
Groups identify
ethical issues in their
project and designs a
consent form
4.15-4.30 Feedback Feedback Feedback, closing and
certification
Workshop on ‘Basics of Survival Analysis’ 19th and 20th August 2013

A workshop was organized for the faculty and postgraduates from various medical colleges on 19th and 20th August 2013 on ‘Basics of Survival Analysis’. Dr. Pradeep Deshmukh, Professor of Community Medicine from Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram was the resource person for the workshop. There were 21 participants for the workshop. Participants learned about the basics of survival analysis along with hands-on experience with various exercises solved over the same. Participants took this workshop as an opportunity to understand Survival Analysis for using it in future endeavors.

Basic course workshop on Medical Education Technologies

(under the auspicious of Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute)

26th – 28th November, 2013.

CMEOD-1.JPG

Second Basic Course Workshop in ‘Medical Education Technologies’ was held from 26th to 28th November, 2013 at SMVMCH. A total of 22 senior, mid and junior level faculties’ form our institute participated in the workshop. Dr.Pankaj B Shah, was the observer from SRMC &RI, Chennai (MCI nodal center).

Orientation of first batch of Post-graduates in research methods

Last year, we have admitted first batch of post-graduates in 7 pre-clinical subjects and in Community Medicine. Half –a-day sessions over a period of six days from 13 June to 18 June 2012 were conducted for sensitization of post-graduates on research methods. There were 13 participants and sessions were interactive and participatory in nature. Following topics were covered by Department of Community Medicine. We also had a very informative session on ‘how to write a thesis protocol’ by Dr Gitanjali Batnamabane, a distinguished faculty of Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Post-graduate Medicine and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, currently working as Technical Officer at World Health Organization, New Delhi. As reflected in the feedback, the sessions were well received by the participants. There was significant improvement in their pre and post median scores.

Program for Post-graduate sensitization program
Date Time Topics
13.06.2011 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm How to select a topic for research?
And how to do literature search?
14.06.2011 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm Sample and sampling
15.06.2011 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm Study designs
16.06.2011 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm Basic statistics
17.06.2011 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm Test of significance
18.06.2011 2.30 pm to 4.30 pm Ethical issues in research

CMEOD-2.jpg

Post-graduates doing group work in a interactive session during their orientation program

Retro-pre feedback by Participating Post-graduate students
Questions Pre median Post median P value
I can perform ‘Literature search’ using electronic data base for my
research work
2.0 5.0 0.002
I can calculate ‘sample size’ for my research work 0.0 0.4 0.003
I can select ‘sample’ (sampling) for my research work 1.0 4.0 0.003
I can select ‘study design’ for my research work 1.0 4.0 0.002
I can apply ‘ t test of significance’ to my research work 0.0 4.0 0.002
I can interpret 95% confidence interval and p value in the searched
literature
0.0 4.0 0.001
Positive and negative response of participants of PG orientation program (13 June-18 June, 2011)
Facilitating factors Barriers or suggestion for
improvement
Understood some basic statistics. Concepts of Null
hypothesis and p value is clear now
Needs comments on individual PG thesis
topics
Making us do group work Better to conduct sessions in morning
hours-3
Provided hard copies of the material Sessions were purely mathematical, with
less practical relevance
Method of approach and planning Needs a break time
Examples are given No barriers-2
Good ambience-2 More clarifications on the words used
was needed
Group discussion was useful-3 Needs more examples
Very good interactive sessions Give time to participants to ask questions
Group work and taking comments from everyone,
sessions were free – 2
More pictorial and graphical presentation
required
Clear-cut presentations
Clarity and politeness
Inspiration from experienced faculties
Easy and concise teaching in simple seven classes
Opening the doors to the world of thesis
Good presentations
Session on ‘how to search literature’ was useful
Exercises, tea, ambience, AV aids and students ‘
involvement
I started concentrating nicely
Workshops on Qualitative Research Methods

Since, last three years, we have been supporting and organizing four and half day residential workshops on qualitative research methods for young health professionals in India. Two sessions were held at Mahatma Gandhi of Medical Sciences, Sewagram, Wardha and one session was held at our department. Our workshop curriculum content is blended with participatory, in-depth and systematic techniques of qualitative methods. It offers hands-on experience on manual content analysis and software-aided analysis of qualitative data. The workshop curriculum is based on our previous experience and participants’ feedback.

A workshop was held at Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Pondicherry in South India from 28 March to 1 April, 2011. The participants were eleven mid-carrier teaching faculties (Community Medicine-9, Obstetrics and Gynaecology-2) and two first year post-graduate students in the subject of Community Medicine. The workshop participants were registered on first-cum-first-serve basis. The resource persons were two trained Community Medicine teaching faculties. Session plan for the workshop is given below.

Workshops on Qualitative Research Methods

Since, last three years, we have been supporting and organizing four and half day residential workshops on qualitative research methods for young health professionals in India. Two sessions were held at Mahatma Gandhi of Medical Sciences, Sewagram, Wardha and one session was held at our department. Our workshop curriculum content is blended with participatory, in-depth and systematic techniques of qualitative methods. It offers hands-on experience on manual content analysis and software-aided analysis of qualitative data. The workshop curriculum is based on our previous experience and participants’ feedback.

A workshop was held at Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Pondicherry in South India from 28 March to 1 April, 2011. The participants were eleven mid-carrier teaching faculties (Community Medicine-9, Obstetrics and Gynaecology-2) and two first year post-graduate students in the subject of Community Medicine. The workshop participants were registered on first-cum-first-serve basis. The resource persons were two trained Community Medicine teaching faculties. Session plan for the workshop is given below.

CMEOD-3.jpg

Workshop on ‘Qualitative Research Methods’ at SMVMCH, Pondicherry

Workshop program

Time 28 March
Monday
29 March
Tuesday
30 March
Wednesday
31 March
Thursday
1 April
Friday
9.00-9.30 Welcome, and
Introduction
Re-cap of day
one
Re-cap of day
two
Re-cap of day
three
Re-cap of day
four
9.30-10.00 Starting the
Journey –
Ground rules
Free listing
exercise
Focus Group
Discussion (FGD)
Basic terms used in
QDA analysis
Ethical issues in
qualitative
research
10.00-10.30 Refreshments Refreshments Refreshments Refreshments Refreshments
10.30-11.00 Introduction to
Qualitative
Research
Introduction
to Anthropac
Focus Group
Discussion
Game: Playing
with Candies
How should one
report
qualitative
research?
11.00-11.30 Whose reality
count? (Film)
Demo on
free listing
Demo on
FGD
Instructions for manual
content analysis
Experience
sharing and
Closing
11.30-12.00 Exercise and
practice on
free listing
Individual
work on FGD
Participants apply
lessons learned to
content analysis of
transcripts
Retro-pre
feedback
12.00-13.00 What is
Participatory
Research?
Tools?
Sharing of
individual
work
13.00-14.00 Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch
14.00-15.00 Social mapping
(Demo-case study)
Pile sorting
exercise
Key Informant
Interview
(KII)
Atlas-ti – Use in content
analysis
15.00-15.15 Refreshments Refreshments Refreshments Refreshments
15.15 –16.00 Other tools
(Demo-case studies)
Exercise and
practice on
pile sort
In-depth
Interview
(IDI)
Sampling in qualitative
research
16.00-16.15 Feedback Feedback Feedback Feedback

Overall, the consensuses for all sessions were good. There was significant improvement in participants’ skills in application and analysis of qualitative data. As perceived by the participants, the facilitating factors in workshop environment were - better care of physiological needs of the participants, good physical environment, and well-planned interactive session.

CMEOD-4.jpg

List of participants for workshop on ‘Qualitative Methods in Health Research’ at Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, 2011

Name of the participants Institute of affiliation
Dr Sujata S Pol, LTMMC, Sion , Mumbai
Dr Vijay Kumar Singh LTMMC, Sion, Mumbai
Dr M Surya Durga Prasad Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad
Dr B Manoj Aravind Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad
Dr Rajini S AVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr Vaishali Misale AVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr Abhijeet Boratne MMCH, Chennai
Dr Shib Shekhar Datta MMCH, Chennai
Dr Basanta Kumar Behera and Dr Thirunavukarasu SVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr M Jayasree and Dr N Fatima Shawthini SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr Bharat Raj LNIMS, Pondicherry
Supported events organized for Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program (RNTCP) by the Department of Community Medicine
  1. A CME was organized on 24 March 2008 for the faculties in our college. The sessions were facilitated by the faculties from the Department of Community Medicine, Chest & TB Medicine and Microbiology. The programme was moderated by the Dr.S.Govindarajan, State TB Officer in Puducherry. 61 faculties attended the program.
  2. State level RNTCP conference was organized on 24 March 2010 with support from State Task Force (STF), Puducherry and RNTCP, Puducherry. The conference was inaugurated by Dr. Dilip Kumar Baliga, Director, Health and Family Welfare, Puducherry. It was facilitated by the Dr.S.Govindarajan, State TB Officer, Puducherry, Dr. Anil Purthy, Chairman, STF. The sessions were presided over by our Honourable Chairman. Vice-Chairman, Director and Medical Superintendent attended the function.
  3. A hands-on training on Guidelines on RNTCP was organized for first batch of Medical Interns. Sessions were interactive.
  4. Since last five years, ‘World TB Day celebration’ is being carried out by conducting IEC activities in Community and Schools.

CMEOD-5.jpg

List of assignments and on-going projects where DCM is\was actively involved

Title of project Organization Year Role of
Department
Infant Death Review of two
districts in the state of
Karnataka
UNICEF, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 2011 Reviewer
Qualitative evaluation of
Community-based Palliative
Care Plus Project in
Tamil Nadu and Kerala
Help Age India, New Delhi 2011 Evaluation
team member
Effect of community-based
palliative care program on the
quality of life of elderly in
rural south India
Help Age India Institute of Palliative Care (IPM),
Calicut FourX4 Consulting. Ltd,
New Delhi Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences,
Sewagram
2011 Principle
Investigator
Formative research for
Infant and Young Child
Feeding (IYCF) practices in Bihar
Aga Khan Foundation (AKF), New Delhi 2011 As a
member on
formative
research
committee
On-going ‘Educational Innovation Projects
Title of project Organization Year Role of
Department
Development of Community-based teaching
curriculum for medical undergraduates
PSG – FAIMER,
Coimbatore
2010 -2011 Principle
Investigator
Characteristics of successful community-based
education innovation projects
FAIMER,
Philadelphia
2010-2011 Team leader in
Investigation
The following are the research activities undertaken in the year 2012-2013
  • Conferences and workshop attended by the Post-graduates
  • Research Projects undertaken in the Department of Community Medicine
  • Conferences attended & papers presented by the Faculty
  • National and International Consultations by the faculty of the Department
  • Faculties as a resource person in Workshops at college/regional/national level
  • Workshops attended by the faculties of the Department
  • Papers published in last one year- International Journal (indexed in Pub Med)
  • Papers published in last one year- National Journals
Conferences and workshop attended by the Post-graduates (Jan- Dec 2013)
Name of the Conference Date PGs attending the conference
Workshop on Qualitative Research Methods SMVMCH, Pondicherry Jan 7-11, 2013 Dr.Gurukartik
First International management development programme, SRM, Chennai Jan 9-10, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr.Anand
International conference on protection of child rights: issues and challenges Pondicherry university, Pondicherry Jan 18-20, 2013 Dr.Thiru
40thAnnual National Conference of IAPSM GMC, Nagpur Jan 22-24, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr Guru, Dr. Muruganandam
International conference on health care acquired infections and control SMVMCH, Pondicherry Feb 22-23, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr. Anand, Dr. Ramanan
Analysis of categorical research IndiaCLEN, KGMU, Lucknow March 2, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr. Anand
Ethics in medical research IndiaCLEN, KGMU, Lucknow March 3, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr. Anand
Workshop on Qualitative Research Methods CMC, Vellore May 13-15, 2013 Dr. Muruganandam, Dr.Venkatesh
Workshop on Epi _info software program SMVMCH, Pondicherry May 16-17, 2013 Dr Guru, Dr. Muruganandam, Dr.Venkatesh
Fundamentals of biostatistics , Principles of Epidemiology and SPSS CMC, Vellore May 20-24, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr. Anand, Dr. Ramanan
Workshop on presentation skills SMVMCH, Pondicherry May 29, 2013 Dr Guru, Dr. Muruganandam, Dr.Venkatesh
Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates SMVMCH, Pondicherry July 2-4, 2013 Dr. Karthikeyan, Dr.Kirubakaran, Dr Sahithyaa
Workshop on Survival Analysis SMVMCH, Pondicherry Aug 19-20,2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr. Anand, Dr. Ramanan, Dr Guru, Dr.Kirubakaran
South Indian Medical Students’ Conference SMVMCH, Pondicherry Sept 1, 2013 Dr. Ramanan, Dr Guru, Dr. Muruganandam, Dr.Venkatesh
2nd National Conference Forum for Ethics Review Committees in India PSGIMS&R, Coimbatore Nov 8-9,2013 Dr.Thiru ,Dr. Karthikeyan, Dr.Kirubakaran, Dr Sahithyaa
Workshop on Epi _info software program SMVMCH, Pondicherry Nov 22-23,2013 Dr. Karthikeyan, Dr.Kirubakaran, Dr Sahithyaa
Public health practice SEARCH, Ghadchiroli Nov 25-27,2013 Dr.Thiru ,Dr. Karthikeyan
Fundamentals of biostatistics , Principles of Epidemiology and SPSS CMC, Vellore Nov 25-29,2013 Dr Guru, Dr. Muruganandam, Dr.Venkatesh
National Seminar on Health care management 2013 Manipal university, Manipal Dec 3-5, 2013 Dr.Thiru, Dr. Anand, Dr. Ramanan
Karnataka Geriatric Conference 2013 Bangalore Dec 6-7, 2013 Dr Guru, Dr. Muruganandam, Dr.Venkatesh
Research Projects undertaken in Department of Community Medicine (Jan- Dec 2013)
Conferences attended & papers presented by the Faculty (Jan – Dec 2013)
Name Conference Paper presented
Dr Amol Annual Indian Clinical Epidemiology Network Conference
2-3 March 2013
KGMC, Lucknow, India.
An evaluation of workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates at SMVMCH, Pondicherry (2012 data).
Oral presentation
National Conference in Health Professionals Education
25-28 September 2013
KEM, Mumbai, India.
An evaluation of workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates at SMVMCH, Pondicherry (2013 data).
Poster presentation
2nd National Conference Forum for Ethics Review Committees in India
8-9November,2013
PSGIMS&R, Coimbatore
Ethical issues in qualitative research
Oral presentation
Awarded - First prize
Dr Arun 45th Annual National Conference of Nutrition, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh Escalating Diabetes epidemic in India: Do dietary determinants act differently than conventionally believed
Oral presentation
South East Asia Regional Public Health Conference & 57th All India Annual Conference (IPHA), Kolkata -
Dr Suguna National Conference on Health Professionals Education 2013
25-28 September 2013
KEM, Mumbai, India
Teaching postgraduates as how to conduct a workshop
Poster presentation
National and International Consultations by the faculty of the Department
Faculty Assignments
Dr Amol Invited as member of International team writing distance learning course material on Teaching and Learning in Medicine (Learning in Community) held in London during 9-11 February, 2013 by Centre for Medical Education in Context, UK
Invited as an expert on National Consultation for Professionalism in Health Profession Education held on April 1-3, 2013 at Pramukhswami Medical College, Karamsad, Gujarat, India.
Invited as a FAIMER faculty at PSG- FAIMER regional centre, Coimbatore, during on-site session for capacity building of Medical Educators in South Asia during, April 2009, 23 April to 3 May 2010 and 2 to 10 April 2011 and, April 2012, April, 2013.
Faculties as a resource person in Workshops at college/regional/national level
Name Date College level/ Regional/ National Topic
Dr Amol Jan 7-11, 2013 National Workshop on Qualitative Research Methods at SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Jul 17-20, 2013 National Skills up-gradation workshop in Chronic Disease Management, AIIMS Bhopal
July 2-4, 2013 College level Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates, SMVMC, Pondicherry
26-28th Nov 2013 College level Workshop on Medical Education Technology at SMVMCH Pondicherry
23 Nov Regional level Workshop on research in medical education
19-20 Aug, 2013 Regional level Workshop on Survival Analysis
May 23, 2013 College level Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research
Dr Kalai Jan 7-11, 2013 National Workshop on Qualitative Research Methods at SMVMCH, Pondicherry
23 Nov Regional level Workshop on research in medical education
May 16-17,2013 College level Workshop on Epi _info software program SMVMCH, Pondicherry
July 2-4, 2013 College level Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates, SMVMCH, Pondicherry
26-28th Nov 2013 College level Workshop on Medical Education Technology at SMVMCH Pondicherry
Dr Murugan July 2-4, 2013 College level Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates, SMVMCH, Pondicherry
26-28th Nov 2013 College level Workshop on Medical Education Technology at SMVMCH Pondicherry
July 2-4, 2013 College level Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr Suguna July 2-4, 2013 College level Orientation Workshop on Research Methods for first year Post-graduates SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr. Abhishek May 16-17, 2013 College level Workshop on Epi _info software program, SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Workshops attended by the faculties of the Department
Name Date Local/Regional/ National Topic
Dr Amol Jul 24, 2013 National WHO-ICMR dissemination workshop on Clinical Trial Registry- India (CTRI) at Madurai
Sep 25, 2013 National Workshop on ‘Use of Moodle, National Conference in Health Professions Education at KEM, Mumbai
Workshop on ‘Developing Competency-based Education’, National Conference in Health Professions Education at KEM, Mumbai
Dr Singh Aug 19-20,2013 Regional Workshop on Survival AnalysisSMVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr Kalai 2012 / 2013 National RNTCP Zonal Task Force (ZTF) Workshop, South Zone
Apr 3,2013 Regional Workshop on Bioethics for Members of ‘Institute Ethics Committee’ JIPMER, Pondicherry
May 23, 2013 Local Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research’
Jul 18-20, 2012 Regional Faculty Development workshop on ‘Medical Educational Technologies’ SRM&RI, MCI nodal centre
Sep 16-28, 2013 National RNTCP Modular training at NTI, Bangalore,
Dr Murugan Jan 7-11, 2013 National Workshop on Qualitative Research Methods at SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Mar9-10, 2013 Regional Workshop on " Efficient, Quality-Assured Data Capture usingEpi Data" at JIPMER, Pondicherry
Aug 19-20,2013 Regional Workshop on Survival AnalysisSMVMCH, Pondicherry
May 23, 2013 Local Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research’
Dr Arun Jun 21-22, 2012 National Workshop at Modern approaches to Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Infectious diseases, CMC Vellore
May 23, 2013 Regional Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research
May 16-17, 2013 Local Workshop on Epi _info software program, SMVMCH, Pondicherry
26-28th Nov 2013 Regional Workshop on Medical Education Technology at SMVMCH Pondicherry
May 27-31, 2013 National NIHFW: Certificate course in Hospital Management, Contact program
Dr Prasad Mar9-10, 2013 Regional Workshop on " Efficient, Quality-Assured Data Capture usingEpi Data" at JIPMER, Pondicherry
May 16-17, 2013 Local Workshop on Epi _info software program, SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Aug 19-20,2013 Local Workshop on Survival AnalysisSMVMCH, Pondicherry
Dr Suguna Aug 19-20,2013 Local Workshop on Survival AnalysisSMVMCH, Pondicherry
Nov 22-23,2013 Regional Workshop on Epi _info software program, SMVMCH, Pondicherry
Nov26-28, 2013 Regional Workshop on Medical Education Technology at SMVMCH Pondicherry
Dr Abhishek May 23, 2013 Regional Workshop on ‘Ethics in Research
Aug 19-20,2013 Regional Workshop on Survival AnalysisSMVMCH, Pondicherry
26-28th Nov 2013 Regional Workshop on Medical Education Technology at SMVMCH Pondicherry
Papers published in last one year- International Journal (indexed in Pub Med)
  1. Abraham RR, Vyas R, Sood R, Banu S, Dongre AR, Ashwini CA, Jain A, Chacko TV.Adult learning principles in an online learning faculty development program.Thrita Journal of Medical Sciences 2012;1(3):77-81.
  2. Updhaya S, Shetty S, Kumar S, Dongre A, Deshmukh P. Institutionalizing district level Infant Death Review in a developing country setting; an experience from Southern India. WHO South East Asia Journal of Public Health 2012;1(4):446-456.
  3. Mahalakshmi T, Dongre AR, Kalaiselvan G. Teaching statistics to medical undergraduates using interactive and participatory sessions. Journal of Advances in Medical Education and Professionalism 2013.1:4.
Papers published in last one year- National Journals
  1. Deshmukh PR, Sinha N, Dongre AR. Social determinants of stunting in rural area of Wardha, Central India. Medical Journal Armed Forces 2013. Available at - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mjafi.2012.10.004
  2. Gurukartick J, Ghorpade AG, Thamizharasi A, Dongre AR. Status of Growth Monitoring in Anganwadi Centres of a Primary Health Centre, Thirubhuvanai, Puducherry. Online J Health Allied Scs. 2013;12(2):2. Available at URL: http://www.ojhas.org/issue46/2013-2-2.html
  3. Kumar VA, Kalaiselvan G, Purushothaman V, Dongre AR. Experiences Sharing on Hospital - Based Surveillance at Department of Community Medicine, SMVMCH, Puducherry, India. National Journal of Research in Community Medicine. Vol. 2. Issue 2. July-Sep. 2013 (079-148)
  4. Murugan V, Dongre AR. Breastfeeding Week Celebrations in Rural Puducherry; Letter to Editor. Indian Journal of Community Medicine. Oct 2013; Vol 38: Issue 4.
  5. Murugan V, Dongre AR. An Evaluation of Community-Based Action Research Program for Medical Undergraduates in Rural Pondicherry. Online J Health Allied Scs. 2013; 12(3):6. Available at URL: http://www.ojhas.org/issue47/2013-3-6.html

Papers published in last one year

International Journals (Indexed in Pub Med)
  1. Ganapathy Kalaiselvan, Amol R Dongre, Mahalakshmy T. Epidemiology of injury in rural Pondicherry, India. Journal of Injury and Violence Research, 2011;3(2):61-66.
  2. Amol R Dongre. Photo-elicitation as a tool of public health teaching and learning (Letter). Education for Health, 2011; 24(1). Available from URL: http://www.educationforhealth.net/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=491
  3. Dongre AR, Deshmukh PR. Farmers’ suicides in Maharashtra, India: A qualitative exploration of their perspectives. Journal of Injury and Violence Research 2011Jan;3(1):2-6.
  4. Amol R Dongre, Ganapathy Kalaiselvan, Mahalakshmy T. How medical undergraduates do benefit from exposure to community -based survey research? Education for Health. At - http://www.educationforhealth.net/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=591
  5. Dongre AR, Deshmukh PR, Garg BS. Community Led Initiative for control of anemia among unmarried adolescent girls and children from rural Wardha. Food Nutrition and Bulletin. December 2011; 32(4): 315-323.

National Journals

  1. Mahalakshmy T, Amol R Dongre. Ganapathy Kalaiselvan. Epidemiology of childhood injuries in rural Pondicherry, India. Indian J of Pediatrics. [Online first]
  2. Mahalakshmi T., Kalaiselvan G, Parmar J, Dongre Amol. Coverage and compliance to diethylcarbamazine in relation to the Filaria Prevention Assistants in rural Puducherry, India. J Vector Borne Dis. 47, June 2010, pp. 1-3.
  3. Raja Yalla, Amol R Dongre. Vector indices in rural Pondicherry. Asian Student Medical Journal. 2011; 5(3). Available from URL: http://www.asmj.info/archives/astudyonvectorindicesinruralpondicherry
  4. Dongre AR, Deshmukh PR, Garg BS. Health needs of Ashram schools in rural Wardha. Online J of Health and Allied Sciences, Vol 10 (1); 2011. Available from URL: http://www.ojhas.org/issue37/2011-1-2.htm
  5. Dongre AR, Deshmukh PR, Garg BS. Health Promoting School Initiative in Ashram Schools of Wardha district: An Evaluation. National Medical Journal of India, 2011; 24(3):140-143.

Invitation to faculties as a resource person\facilitator\evaluator

  1. Invited as a FAIMER faculty at PSG- FAIMER regional centre, Coimbatore during first on-site session for capacity building of Medical Educators in South Asia during 2 to 10 April 2011.
  2. Invited as a resource person for guest lecture on ‘Diabetes Awareness’ at Sri Aravind Hospital, Villupuram on December 17, 2011.
  3. Invited as resource person for facilitating workshop on ‘Application of qualitative research methods in health research’ held at MGIMS, Sewagram Wardha during 16-20 August, 2011.
  4. Invited as a resource person for workshop on ‘How and what to teach in Community Medicine held at Indira Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Puducherry on 3 August, 2011.
  5. Invited as evaluation team member for evaluation of ‘Evaluation of Community Managed Palliative Care Plus Project by HelpAge, India in February-March 2011.
  6. Invited for field review of Infant Death Review of two districts in the state of Karnataka by UNICEF, Andhra Pradesh during June 28-29, 2011.
  7. Invited as expert to ‘National consultation workshop on Infant Death Review organized by School of Public health, PGIMER, Chandigarh, UNICEF country office, MoHFW, New Delhi on 13 and 14 October 2011.

Urban Health Centre, Thirukkanur

Department of Community Medicine
Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital

Introduction

The Urban Health Centre (UHTC) is ten kilometre away from the hospital campus. It is running since year 2005 and is one of the oldest activities of the Department of Community Medicine. It is run by a team of post-graduate student, medical inters and nursing staff under supervision of faculty in charge. It also supports local Primary Health Centre in implementation of national health programs and special activities like Health day celebrations. We work in 19 villages of two primary health centres having total population of 47,402. It is our field practice area for community-based research, health education and community-orientation to medical undergraduates.

The activities of UHTC are
  1. OPD at the centre
  2. Support to local Primary Health Centre
  3. School Health Education Program
  4. Adolescent group meetings
  5. Internship training program
  6. Water surveillance program
  7. Researches activities

Faculty in charge for the centre monitors the activities of the centre on daily basis. He also conducts supervisory visit to the centre once a week. A post-graduate in Community Medicine is posted for the period of three months. All the activities in the centre are planned, organized and executed through the dedicated staff of the centre.

OPD at the Centre

Every week days we run OPD at centre during morning hours. Health care is free of charge and basic drugs are provided in the pharmacy. Two third of the beneficiary were women and were from elderly age group. Patients with musculoskeletal problems and respiratory tract infections accounted for more than half of patients. From the month of January 2012 to December 2012 centre has served 8415 patient population with an average 935 cases/month. The details of the number of patients in each month are given below.

Number patients at UHTC OPD (April 2011 to January 2012)
Months Number of patients at OPD
Old cases New cases Total cases
January 345 917 1262
February 493 960 1453
March 381 975 1356
April 308 753 1061
May 333 861 1194
June 320 685 1005
July 385 754 1139
August 381 756 1137
September 324 586 910
October 296 542 838
November 511 629 1140
December 366 637 1003
Total 4443 9055 13498

Support to Primary Health Centre

We encourage our medical interns, post-graduate student and social worker to attend monthly meeting of PHC staff and offer their support if requested. The purpose of this activity is to ensure hands-on exposure to our medical interns to peripheral government health care system and avoid any duplication of efforts.

Functions
  • OPD, MCH clinics and participate in implementation of NHPs
  • Support to the sub-centre clinic and school health program
  • Monthly meeting of PHC staff and offer support if requested
  • Celebration of health days (eg. World TB day, Pulse Polio immunization day etc.)
Pulse Polio Immunization Day Celebration, February 2013

A team of Faculty and 6 interns supplemented the Pulse Polio Immunization activity on Sunday. The team was divided into 4 groups. Each group along with the school volunteers conducted home visits to remind and motivate the parents for polio immunization. The groups further monitored the immunization activities of the peripheral sub centres and finally reported to the Department Faculty and Medical Officer from PHC at the end of the day. In the process, interns learned about administrative and supervisory activities of the Intensive Pulse Polio Immunization program.

Celebration of World TB day, 2013

World TB day was celebrated on 24th March, in collaboration with the PHC, Thirukkanur. Awareness session on TB was enacted by school children. Locally crafted material and informative posters on causation, spread and prevention of tuberculosis were displayed in exhibition in the school. The exhibition was open to general community for two days.

School Health Education Program

In 1960, the Government of India constituted a School Health Committee to assess the standard of health and nutrition of School children. In view of the crucial importance of school health, the Government of India constituted the Task Force to propose an intensive School Health Service Project, which could be implemented on a trial basis. The Task Force identified the following reasons for the poor state of School Health Programme

  1. Lack of transport facilities for the PHC Medical Officer.
  2. Lack budget for printing Health cards.
  3. Lack of properly trained school teachers and health workers who can ensure effective functioning of School Health Services.
  4. Lack of proper documentation and evaluation.

Our purpose to initiate school health programme was to improve the health status of local school going children. Another purpose was to provide an opportunity for medical interns and post-graduates in Community Medicine to get hand-on exposure in running school health program. We have been working in the field of school health education program since last two years. In order to make it more refined, a need was felt to specify its needs based objectives, health education strategy and evaluation plan.

Objectives
  1. To provide needs based health education to school going children in local area.
  2. To evaluate programme periodically to make required changes.

Our post-graduate students posted at UHTC with the Health educator carries out a school health education sessions on weekly basis. Needs-based health education program is followed here. It is an opportunity for medical interns and post-graduate in Community Medicine to have a hands-on experience of running a school health program. The topics for a month are scheduled as follows.

Month Topics for Health Education
January Nutrition and Healthy life style
February Cancer awareness and preventation
March Tuberculosis
April Malaria
May Smoking and Alcoholism
June Environmental hygienic
July Injury prevention
August Breast feeding
September Personal hygienic
October Menstrual hygienic
November Rabies prevention
December HIV awareness

As a part of Breast Feeding Week Celebration in 1st week of August, 2012 awareness session for Student trainees of Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANMs) was conducted. Student trainees were actively involved in the session. At the end of the session, quiz was conducted and winners were awarded the prizes.

Future plans
  1. Evaluation of existing school health education program and refine the approach of program
  2. Develop a module for standardized delivery of scientific and needs-based health education
  3. Introduce more skills-based health education messages
  4. Promote undergraduate projects in the schools environment

Adolescent Group Meetings

Social workers from the department have been actively and consistently involved in forming adolescent group meetings. In the last year, monthly meetings have been in regularly organized with two adolescent groups. Similar efforts are in process to set up more groups over the time.

Health Education of Women’s Self-Help Group Members in Community

We have organized health education sessions on Tuberculosis for two women’s self-help group members. The purpose was to disseminate scientific messages on common injury management and potential harmful practices in injury management. We used flipbook developed at our department after careful research.

24th March 2013, World Tb Day Celebration at Thirukkanur

WORLD TB DAY was celebrated by UHTC unit of Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital at Bharathiyar Tailoring Institute, a governmental training centre on 26th March, 2013. Thirty four members of the institute attended the programme.

24th March 2013, World Tb Day Celebration, at Kalitheerthalkumpam pet & Andiyarpalayam

WORLD TB DAY was celebrated by of Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital at Kalitheerthalkumpam pet & Andiyarpalayam with Self Help groups. In total 45 members attended the meet.

During the program, Mrs. Pushparani, head of the institute welcomed the health team. The introductory speech was given by Dr. Muruganandham. Mr. Ganapathy delivered the health talk on the cause, symptoms and prevention of tuberculosis. Colourful posters showing the symptoms and treatment modalities were displayed and explained to the participants by Mrs. Jayanthi. Dr. Arun Ghorpade summarised the health talk and appealed for spreading take home message on TB by distributing pamphlets in neighbourhood. Ms. Maheshwari, student from the institute gave the vote of thanks. Program concluded question answer and clarification of doubts during tea and snakes session. During one and half hour interaction, all the participants were interactive and enthusiastic. They assured to give their fullest efforts for a TB FREE INDIA!!!

Internship Training Program

We post our medical interns to UHTC and PHC for peripheral exposure. Medical interns are given ‘Internship card’ to document their daily activities under the supervision of faculty in charge and Post-graduate in Community Medicine. Interns are involved in the every activity of the UHTC. At the centre they are trained for medical management of diseases and surgical/operative procedures at the primary care level. We provide them opportunity to interact with community members during field based surveys, SHG meets, school health activities etc.

In afternoon, it is mandatory for interns to be actvvely involved in academic activities. The prototype schedule for the afternoon discussion is as follows.

Training\seminars and capacity building sessions for medical interns

In addition to above activities, all batches of interns are trained on RNTCP guidelines for Medical Officers and Analytical software like Epi Info. Medical interns are given ‘Internship card’ to document their daily activities under the supervision of medical officer and Post-graduate in Community Medicine. We did the analysis of Internship Cards submitted by 91 medical interns of 2007 batch, which is our first batch of recently graduated students. The findings are given below. We are in process of making our internship program more relevant to competencies required for basic primary care physician. The exposure varies from basic medical management of minor ailments, basic surgical/operative procedures to interaction with community members during field based health camps and rural mobile health clinics.

Assessment of medical interns (2007 batch) posting at the Department of Community Medicine
Indicators Urban Health Centre (n=111)
Total number of patients seen (Mean+SD) 161.14 ± 111.54
Total number of patients Treated (Mean+SD) 129.77 ± 74.04
Patients Referred (Mean+SD) 8.82 ± 11.78
Health education in school and community 40(36.04)
Involvement in survey and project activity 9(8.11)
Adolescent clinic 8(7.2)
Epidemiological surveillance 75(67.57)

Water Surveillance Program

Department of Community Medicine has set up a water surveillance system for four villages under UHTC, Thirukkanur.

Objectives of The Program

  1. To evaluate the quality of drinking water from water supplies from rural villages of UHTC, Thirukkanur.
  2. To empower community for ensuring safe drinking water through regular water surveillance activity.

From each village five varied drinking water bodies (i. e. Over head tank, Public school, Anganwadi centre, Public tap and a household sample) are monitored on monthly basis. These samples are tested for chemical and biological quality standards in Public Health Lab of Department of Community Medicine. The standard operating procedure suggested by Tamil Nadu Water Supply and Drainage (TWAD) Board, Chennai is strictly followed. The reports for the water samples are formally informed and submitted to the concerned authority. For the unsafe quality reports, technical support for the water safety is provided.

(Postgraduate & interns in action at Public Health lab of Community Medicine)
(Results of microbiological testing of water samples of villages)
Appearance of black colour in last three samples denotes bacterial contamination

Standard Operating Procedure

Many salts / chemicals are normally dissolved in water and WHO and BIS have prescribed guideline values for various water quality parameters. When these guideline values are exceeded some diseases may be caused and may also affect the aquatic life and crops. The field water testing kit developed by Tamilnadu,Water Supply and Drainage Board (TWAD board) is a simple device, which can be used for testing some critical water quality parameters in the field. The results will be useful in planning and formulating various water supply schemes and will be useful for proper maintenance of water supply schemes.

Water Testing – Methodology

For testing the water in the field, the following aspects are important

  1. Sampling procedures
  2. Testing procedures
  3. Reporting

Sampling Procedure

  • The sources from where water is collected should be in regular use.
    1. Before sampling, the source should be adequately flushed.
    2. For Hand pump sources, before collecting the water, the water should be pumped and wasted for at least three to five minutes to clear all dirt, turbidity and slime.
    3. Water from wells should be taken in the middle at mid depth.
    4. For lakes, rivers and dams, the water should be collected near the off-take point. The water should be collected after the suspended and floating matter.
  • Water for chemical examination should be collected in a clean white 250 ml capacity leak proof pet bottle or polythene container.
  • Before collection of sample, the container should be washed /rinsed with the water to be sampled for at least two to three times.
  • The water should be then filled completely in the container without leaving any air space.
  • Place a polythene sheet (10 x 10 cm.) over the cap and tie it with a rubber band or twine thread to avoid any leak.
  • Write the ‘field code number (sample ID)’ on the container. The field code number’ and the source details should be separately recorded in a notebook.
  • The testing of sample should be completed within 12 Hrs. from the time of collection.

Water Testing Procedures

Using the measuring jar, measure 10 ml water and pour it into the 100 ml polypropylene/titration cup. By observing the water in the cup, record qualitatively the appearance, odour and turbidity.

  1. Appearance

    Recorded appearance as follows:

    Colourless & clear/ Brownish/ Greenish/ Blackish / Slightly whitish/ Turbid etc.

  2. Odour

    Record odour as follows:

    None/ Soil smell/ Algal smell/ Objectionable odour/Rotten egg smell etc.

  3. Turbidity

    Record turbidity as follows:

    No turbidity/ Slightly turbid / Moderately turbid/ Highly turbid

  4. pH

    pH booklets have been provided to measure pH value of water. Tear a portion of the pH paper and hold it by your fingers. Using the ink filler add 1 drop of water sample on the paper. Wait for 10 seconds. The colour change taking place on the wet portion of the pH paper is observed and compared with the pH chart provider in the cover page of pH booklet. Record the pH value.

  5. Alkalinity

    Using the 10 ml measuring cylinder, measure 20 ml of water sample (2 x 10ml) and pour it into the clean titration cup. Add 5 drops of ‘A1’ liquid. The water turns bluish green. Using the ‘1 ml syringe’ provided in the kit, add ‘A2’ liquid (starting from the 40th division). At the end point, the colour of water changes into Orange/ Yellow. Record the number of division of ‘A2’added to reach the end point.

    Calculation: Alkalinity mg/L = No. of Division of ‘A2’ added x 10.

  6. Hardness

    Using the 10 ml measuring cylinder, measure 20 ml of water sample (2 x 10 ml) and pour it into the clean titration cup. Add 5 drops of ‘H1’ and then 5 drops of ‘H2’ liquids. The water in the titration cup turns pink in colour. Using the ‘1 ml syringe’ add ‘H3’ liquid in drops (starting from the 40th division). At the end point, the colour of water changes into Bluish colour. Record the number of divisions of ‘H3’ liquid added to reach the end point.

    Calculation: Hardness mg/L = No. of Divisions of ‘H3’ added x 10.

  7. Chloride

    Using the 10 ml measuring cylinder, measure 20 ml of water sample (2 x 10 ml) and pour it into the clean titration cup. Add 5 drops of ‘C1’ liquid. The water turns yellowish in colour. Using the ‘1 ml syringe’ add ‘C2’ liquid in drops (starting from the 40th division). At the end point, the colour of water changes to slight reddish in colour. Record the numbers of divisions of ‘C2’liquid added to reach the end point.

    Calculation: Chloride mg/L = No. of Divisions of ‘C2’ liquid x 10.

  8. Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)

    The approximate value of TDS can be arrived at by the following calculation:

    Calculation: TDS mg/L = (Alkalinity + hardness + chloride) x 1.2.

  9. Fluoride

    Take 5 ml of water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Add 5 drops of ‘F’ liquid. Mix. Compare the colour with “Fluoride chart” provided and records the fluoride value.

  10. Iron

    Using the measuring cylinder, take 10 ml of water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Add 5 drops of ‘Fe1’ liquid and 1 drops of ‘Fe2’ liquid. Mix. Then add 5 drops of ‘Fe3’ liquid. Mix well. For colourless samples wait for 2 minutes. For turbid sample wait for 5-10 minutes till a persistent, the colour of water will change into red. Compare the ‘red’ colour with the ‘iron chart’ provided and record and record the iron value.

  11. Ammonia

    Using the measuring cylinder, take 10 ml of water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Add 5 drops of ‘AM’ liquid. Gently shake the bottle. If there is no Ammonia, the colour will not change. If Ammonia is present, the water turns yellow. Compare the ‘Yellow’ colour developed with the ‘Ammonia chart’ provided and record the Ammonia value.

  12. Nitrite

    Using the measuring cylinder, take 10 ml of water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Add 2 drops of N2 and 2 drops of ‘N3’liquids. Gently shake the bottle. If there is no Nitrite, the colour will not change. If Nitrite is present, the colour or water will change into pink. Compare the ‘pink’ colour with the ‘Nitrate colour chart’ provided and record the nitrite value.

  13. Nitrate

    Using the 1 ml syringe take 1 ml water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Using the measuring cylinder add 9 ml bottled/distilled water to the same glass bottle. Using a mini spatula add a small pinch (one mustard size only) of metal powder (N1). Add 2 drops of `N2’ and 2 drops of `N3’ liquids. Shake continuously and vigorously for 1 minute. Wait for 5 minutes and immediately compare the colour developed with the `Nitrate colour chart’. If there is no Nitrate, the colour will not change. If Nitrate is present, the colour of water will change into pink. Record the nitrate value.

  14. Phosphate

    Using the measuring cylinder, take 10 ml of water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Add 5 drops of `P1’ liquid. Gently shake the bottle. Then add 1 drop of `P2’ liquid. Again gently shake. If there is no phosphate, the colour will not change. If Phosphate is present, the colour of water changes into blue. Compare the `blue’ colour with the `Phosphate chart’ provided and record the phosphate value.

  15. Residual chlorine

    Using the measuring cylinder, take 10 ml of water sample in the 10 ml glass bottle. Add 5 drops of `RC’ liquid. Slightly shakes the bottle. If there is no residual chlorine, the colour will not change. If residual chlorine is present the colour of water ill change into Yellow. Compare the `Yellow’ colour with the `Chlorine Chart’ provided and recorded the residual chlorine value.

  16. Note: In the tests for rinsing use Distilled water or Bottled/mineral water

  17. E coli /Faecal coliforms

    The test is conducted using H2S vials. The water should be added up to the mark in the H2S vial. After screwing the cap, keep the vial for 24 hrs. After 24 hrs observe any one of the following changes.

    i.Black colour High level of contamination
    ii.Turbid and brownish Moderate level of contamination
    iii.No change in the honey brown colour Absence of E.Coli /Faecal contamination

Handling of Field Kit and Precaution To Be Followed

  1. The liquids provided in the field kit for water testing kit for water testing are chemicals, which are corrosive and toxic. These liquids (reagents) should not be split on the skin. When split on the skin, immediately blot out the liquid using tissue paper and then wash with ordinary water.
  2. Under no circumstance, the chemicals/ liquids in the field kit should be inhaled or consumed.
  3. Misuse of these chemicals/liquids in anyway should be prevented.
  4. When the field kit is used, avoid spillage of chemicals on the floor or within the box. If the spillage is within the box, Wipe out with tissue paper. If the is on the floor, wash it with water.
  5. When not in use, the field kit should be kept at safe place.
  6. When you go out for sampling and testing, it is not necessary to test each sample at the site of sampling itself. A set of samples can be collected and tested at a common place. This can avoid repeated packing, unpacking and washing processes and the resulting wastage of time. However, each sample container should be properly codified before you leave the sampling site.
  7. After sampling, the source details as required should be collected in full and recorded in the register. While noting down the source details the corresponding code number for each sample should be also recorded in the note book.
  8. When testing is carried out for a set of water samples, in order to save time, each test can be carried out on all samples and then proceed with the next test. This can avoid repeated washings.
  9. While going for sampling, you can purchase bottled water and tissue paper from the local shop and these items will be useful while conducting the tests.
  10. While taking the reading in the syringe for titrimetric tests, the initial reading will be at ‘40’.Note down the final reading (say 14). Then the calculation is (40 -14 = 26). Then the value of the parameter is = 26 x 10 = 260 mg/L.
  11. When testing chlorinated sample, first test residual chlorine. Before conducting the other test, keep the sample exposed to air for 30 minutes to allow the chlorine to escape. Then start analysis for other parameters.
  12. After completing the tests, the items like syringe, measuring cylinder, cups, ink filler, bottles etc. should be washed thoroughly with distilled water or mineral/ bottled water. Water from these items should be drained out or even dried before packing.
  13. After completing the tests that containers containing the liquids should be stooped tightly on the cap should also be screwed tightly to avoid leakages. This can help to prolong the shelf life of the reagents used. Any leakages over the bottle should be wiped out with the tissue paper before stoppering the container.
  14. The field kit can be used to test totally 8 parameters – pH, turbidity, hardness, chloride, fluoride, nitrate, iron, residual chlorine.
  15. Tests Significance
    pH All chemical reaction depends on pH of the water, which is nothing but the concentration of hydrogen ions. A low pH can affect the mucous membrane. High pH can upset stomach pH so that the digestion capacity is lost.
    Alkalinity, hardness & chloride These are the major non-metallic constituents in water.
    Fluoride and iron Presence due to the nature of soil and rocks.
    Nitrate Indicates pollution due to agricultural activities.
    Residual chlorine Residual chlorine ensures proper disinfection of water. It can protect from water born diseases.
  16. The chemicals in the field kit can be used to test about 100 water samples. However the number of the samples it can be tested shall depends on the salts present in the water.
  17. The reagents in the field kit have a shelf life of one year.

Schedule For Village Wise Water Sampling and Testing

Sl.No. Day Village Site Code PG In Charge
1. 1st Wednesday Thirukannur T O1
T O2
T S1
T P1
T H1
UHTC PG
2. 2nd Wednesday Chettipattu C O1
C P1
C A1
C S1
C H1
UHTC PG
3. 3rd Wednesday Kunichampattu K O1
K O2
K P1
K S1
K H1
UHTC PG
4. 4th Wednesday Manalipet M O1
M P1
M A1
M S1
M H1
UHTC PG

T: Thirukannur, C: Chettipattu, K: Kunichampattu, M: Manalipet

O: Over head tank, S: School, P: Public tap, H: House hold, A: Anganwadi

Research Activities

Periodic Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) surveys are carried out to explore the community perspective on specific health issues (eg: Breast feeding practices). Focus group discussions (FGD) and interviews are conducted with the supervision of the chief medical officer involving the paramedical workers of the centre. The information generated is used to provide important health education messages for the community. The interns and the field workers are sensitised to the community by field visits conducted to assess community awareness of specific diseases, awareness of availability and utilisation of health services. The following are the lists of research projects conducted in 2012.

No. Titles of the research work carried out
1 Status of growth monitoring in Anganwadi Centres of a Primary Health Centre, Thirubuvanai, Puducherry.
2 House listing of five villages mapping (for needs assessment for UHTC services).
3 Health education material development on breast feeding practices.
4 Health education material development for water and Hygiene.
5 Effect of Health Education on Water Handling Practices in Rural Area of Pondicherry.
6 Qualitative evaluation of weekly iron and folic acid supplementation for adolescents in rural Pondicherry, India.
Field practice area of UHTC

We work in the field of two primary health centres having population of 47,402. There are 14 villages in Primary Health Centre, Thirubhuvani and 5 villages in Thirukkanur Primary Health Centre. Thus, we cover 19 villages under our UHTC field practice area.

Name of PHC Name of the Sub-Centre Name of villages Population
Thirubuvani(3 km) Thiruvandar Kovil Thiruvandar Kovil 4,796.00
Kothapurinatha 1,823.00
Madagadipet Madagadipet 3,033.00
Nallur 1,039.00
Nallur Kuchi palayam 579.00
V.P.Sing Nagar(KTK) 835.00
Kalithirthalkuppam Kalithirthalkuppam 4,510.00
Sannisik kuppam Andiyarpalayam 1,263.00
Sannisik kuppam 860.00
Pidarikuppam 985.00
Sakada pattu 257.00
Madagadipattu palaiyam 1,931.00
Thirupuvanai palayam 2,108.00
Thirubuvani Thirubuvani 8,246.00
Total PHC population 32,265.00
Thirukkanur Thirukannur 5386
Chettipattu 2751
Kunichampattu 3626
Manalipet 1202
K.R.Palayam 2172
Total PHC population 15,137
Total population 47,402

Urban Health Training Centre, Villupuram

Department of Community Medicine,
Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital
Annual Report 2013
Inauguration of UHTC Villupuram

The inaugural function of Urban Health Training Centre (UHTC), Villipuram was held on 25 January 2013. Shri M Dhansekaran, the Chairman and the Managing director, has graced the occasion as the chief guest, while Vice chairman Shri S.V. Sugumaran, director Dr D Rajagovindan, Dean (Academic) Dr Kagne, Medical superintendent Dr. Boopathy, Dean Dr M Amarnathan were the guest of honour. HODs of all the clinical departments, RMO Dr Asai Thambi, Nursing Superintendent Mrs Kamalanaveni and Deputy Nursing superintendent Mrs Greeta Gunacilan were present for the inauguration.

The Urban Health Training Centre is fifteen kilometres away from the hospital campus, located in the heart of Villupuram, near the new bus stand. It is run by a team of Assistant professors, post graduates, medical interns and nursing staff. The nearby slum of Valudhareddy having a population of 4104 is the field practice area of the UHTC. The outreach activities are in the form of mobile clinic at Chintamani village, Kanai village and Virattikuppam Pattai.

The activities at UHTC are –
  1. OPD at the centre
  2. Mobile clinics
  3. Training of Interns and post graduates
  4. School Health Education Program
OPD at the centre

The OPD is run on every week days at the centre. Health care is free of charge and basic drugs are provided in the pharmacy. Counselling about prevention of disease and promotion of Health is the main focus.

OPD census at UHTC (January 2013 to May 2013)
Months Number of patients seen at OPD
January 32
February 151
March 116
April 109
May 159
June 337
Total 904
Mobile clinics

As a part of outreach activity of the UHTC, mobile clinics are held at Chintamani village, Kanai village and Virattikuppam Pattai. Cooperation of the respective village panchayat’s is taken for the success of the mobile camps in the form of place for camp and publicity of the camp. Every Wednesday mobile clinic is held at Chintamani village, having a population of 3124.Since June every alternate Thursday’s mobile clinic is being held at Kanai village, having a population of 3950 and Virattikuppam Pattai, having a population of 3677.

Number of patients at the mobile clinic (May 2013-June 2013)
Venue Patients checked in May Patients checked in June Total
Chintamani village 166 185 351
Kanai village 0 163 163
Virattikuppam Pattai 0 35 35
Total 166 383 549

(January 2013 to June 2013) = 1453 (OPD + Mobile clinic)

Two Higher secondary schools in Villupuram 1) Government High school, opposite BSNL office and 2) Government High school, Poonthottam are given Health education sessions monthly by Medical Social worker Mr Ganapathy, postgraduates and interns.

Date Name of school Topics
14/2/2013 Government high school, opposite BSNL Cancer and its Prevention
26/2/2013 Government high school, Poonthottam Cancer and its Prevention
28/3/2013 Government high school, opposite BSNL Tuberculosis
28/3/2013 Government high school, Poonthottam Tuberculosis

On 28/3/2013 at Government high school, opposite BSNL, Villupuram, exhibition with digital banners about Tuberculosis and Quiz programme on Tuberculosis and its prize distribution was done.

World Health Day 2013 celebration

Theme for World Health day 2013 is high blood pressure. So a role play was held at Valludhareddy slum on Hypertension on 5/4/2013. The audience were also given a health talk and their queries were cleared. This was followed by Blood pressure check up of 70 adults. Refreshments were also provided to the audience.

Villupuram UHTC Health check-up Camp

A Health check-up camp was organised at Urban Health Training Centre, Villupuram on 1/6/2013 by the Department of Community Medicine, SMVMCH, in partnership with the Micro-financing Institution Equitas. The camp was held from 9.30 to 1.30 with MSW, ANM, interns, postgraduates, Assistant professors and was supervised by Head of the Department of Community Medicine Dr Amol Dongre, Associate Professor Dr Kalaiselvan. All the patients were given free health check-up, free medicines and counselling. The total number of patients who were checked was 66.

Villupuram UHTC Health check-up camp

A Health check-up camp was held at Villupuram UHTC in collaboration with the Girubalaya NGO on 15/6/2013. The Bus from SMVMCH picked the beneficiaries from Maharajapuram and Thamaraikulam slum. Medical social worker Mr Marianathan along with NGO members helped in assembling the patients at UHTC. The patients were given a health talk and orientation regarding the services provided by UHTC Villupuram by the MSW and doctors. A team of Assistant professor, post graduates and interns conducted the health check-up. The patients were also given free drugs by OPD ANM. The camp was held from 9.30 am to 1pm. The total numbers of patients were 70. The patients thanked the Villupuram UHTC after the successful completion of the camp. The patients were dropped back near their homes after the camp by SMVMCH Bus.

Efforts done to increase OPD attendance-
  1. Barbers union members were given health talk and information about the centre on the occasion of world beauty day 15 May.
  2. Autorikshaw drivers union head and Bus drivers union head were given information about the UHTC and were called for Health check-up in UHTC along with their families in the first week of May
  3. Municipalty workers union were also given information about the centre
  4. Local NGOsReward society, Kalvikendra,Kirubalaya, Kasturibai were approached for advocacy of the UHTC.
  5. Slums
    1. Valludhareddy slum

      Residents of the nearby slum Valudhareddy were approached through their Councellor, Mr MuthuGaneshan and Anganwadi worker Mrs Baby.

    2. Indira Nagar Slum, Kanai road

      Mrs Laxmi representative of Kasturibai NGO helped Mr Marianathan MSW for door to door visit to the houses and issuing of pamphlets.

    3. Periya colony, backside of west police station.

      Pamplets were distributed with the help of Mrs Prasann,a a social health activist.

  6. Women self help groups

    Women self help groups were approached through following Micro Finance Institutions

    1. Equitas
    2. BWDA
    3. Smyle
  7. School:

    School Principals and Physical education teachers of following schools in Villupuram were given information about the services of our UHTC and they disseminated this information to their students.

    1. St. Xavier Matriculation High school , Keezhperumpakkam
    2. Government Middle school, Valludhareddy
    3. John Dewey Matriculation High schoo, KK road
    4. ARM Higher Secondary school, Kalyan Theatre road
    5. St. John Special Higher Secondary School for Handicapped, Mandakarai
  8. College

    Elumalai Poly-technique college, Trichy main road, staff was is informed about the UHTC.

  9. Churches

    Our Medical Social Worker Mr Marianathan persuaded the Parish Priest of Saint Xaviers Church and Madha Koil Church, Villupuram to announce about the UHTC at the end of Sunday Mass(prayer) and also the pamphlets were displayed at their notice boards.

  10. Masjid Masjid Imams of Keezhperumpakkam and Salamedu were also informed about the UHTC and they agreed to inform their followers.

Future Plans

  1. Adolescent girls groups

    Adolescent girls form a vulnerable group and their needs are rarely met. In order to provide them with a holistic understanding about their needs like the social and reproductive health needs, nutritional requirements and mental health problems, we will be forming at least two adolescent groups with 10 to 12 members each in the age group 12-19 years, with more focus on school drop- outs from a nearby place from the UHTC. This programme will benefit the adolescent girls as well as be a tool to improve the OPD attendance of UHTC. We also wanted to provide them with counselling sessions with the help of our female social worker if required. The groups will be equipped with life skill education during the follow up visits.

  2. Family folders

    To provide health services to the people residing in the surrounding places of the UHTC and to keep a log of their health records and to provide adequate follow up care, we have planned to make family folders for about 150 to 200 households in Vazhudhareddy area which is about 1 km from the UHTC and has around 900 households. The social worker had already initiated the work and obtained permission from the Councillor and sought the peoples’ cooperation in the carrying out the process. In the first step, we will be making a map of the area with the help of social workers and PG’s. Later the family folders will be filled by the same team by house to house visit. The data will also be fed in the system for future research purpose

Rural Health Training Centre, Thiruvanainallur

Department of Community Medicine
Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital

Introduction

Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC), Thiruvanainallur is located 26 km away from the medical college campus and hospital in Villupuram district of Tamil Nadu. The centre is equipped with basic medical facilities and laboratory services. The care provided is free of cost. It is run by a team of medical officer, medical interns, social workers and a post-graduate in Community Medicine.

Its new building was inaugurated on 6 December 2009 and started operating from 12 March 2010. The centre provides basic health care to neighbouring villages. It also provides an opportunity for medical interns and post-graduates in Community Medicine to sharpen their clinical and epidemiological skills required to manage common public health problems in our local area. The present centre is seen as a potential place for community-based teaching of medical undergraduates.

The major activities of the Centre are
  1. OPD at Centre
    • Geriatric clinic
    • Physiotherapy unit
  2. Rural Mobile Clinic in four villages
  3. Internship Training Program
  4. Community Oriented Medical Education (COME)
  5. School Health Education Program
  6. Celebration of national health days
  7. Research
OPD at centre

OPD runs every weekday from 8.30 am to 1 pm and then 2 pm to 8 pm. It receives laboratory support with basic investigations such as basic blood and urine examination, haemoglobin estimation (Draskin method), blood sugar (calorimetric method), and serum cholesterol and blood urea. OPD is also supported by a counselling centre. It offers free treatment for minor ailments. We are in process to initiate essential drug pharmacy managed by medical interns and nurses. The centre has a pharmacy attached to it. Patients who need referral are referred to our hospital or nearest government hospital at Villupuram. The details of the number of patients in each month are given below.

Number patients at RHTC OPD and Rural Mobile Clinics (April 2012 to March 2013)
Months Number of patients at OPD Number of patients at Rural Mobile Clinic
April 2496 679
May 2934 465
June 3008 744
July 3679 568
August 3500 654
September 3998 721
October 4092 661
November 4817 801
December 4225 948
January 3435 759
February 3860 780
March 3682 623
Total 43726 7724
Progress in number of patients in RHTC OPD over the period (April 2012 to March 2013)

RHTC-OPD.png

Physiotherapy unit

A physiotherapy unit was started with a trained physiotherapist. The unit consist of infra red radiation, wax bath, short wave diathermy, inferential therapy, ultrasound stimulator, wood radar and marine wheel. Conditions like osteoarthritis, neck pain, low backache, stroke etc were treated.


Number patients at physiotherapy unit till March 2013
Months Male Female Total
December 44 70 114
January 156 235 391
February 186 191 377
March 228 240 468
Total 614 736 1350
Geriatric clinic

As a part of OPD a geriatric clinic was started for old patients (>60 years), twice a week. A team of trained medical interns, a post-graduate, a faculty in Community Medicine and a counselor screen and counsel the elderly patients for common medical and mental health problems. The screening tool is structured and has been adopted from NIMHANS experience during our faculty’s Fellowship at NIMHANS, Bangalore. The screening tool consists of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-5), Psychosis screening, Alzheimer’s disease (AD8) questionnaire and checklist of common medical conditions. We screen the patients for early detection of health problems, counsel them\their caregivers and refer them to specialty OPD for further care.

Number patients at geriatric clinic till March 2013
Month Elderly screened
July 80
August 104
September 122
October 86
November 286
December 91
January 108
February 146
March 102
Rural Mobile Clinic

Among the most visible activities of RHTC, is ‘Rural Mobile Clinic’ (RMC) in the villages. During these clinics, Primary care for minor ailments is provided at village level. It is conducted from Tuesday to Friday (four days) during the morning hours on fixed days in the village. We have selected four villages within ten kilometer area. It is run by a team of medical interns and nursing staff. No user fee is charged for the service. It provides an entry point for other health promotive and preventive activities in the village. It is an opportunity to build-up contact and faith among the villagers and to develop better understanding of the community among the staff of RHTC. It offers an opportunity to medical interns to educate patients in their social environment. The details of the number of patients in each month are given below.

Objectives:
  1. To ensure access to Primary health care to the villagers at their doorstep.
  2. To ensure interaction of medical interns and postgraduate students with the local community.
Progress in number of patients in Rural Mobile Clinic over the period (April 2012 to March 2013)

 RHTC-OPD2.png

Days and village name for Rural Mobile Clinic
Weekday Name of the village
Tuesday Kirimedu
Wednesday Chithilingamadam
Thursday Periyasevalai
Friday Semmar
Internship Training Program

We post our medical interns at RHTC for field exposure. Medical interns are given ‘Internship card’ to document their daily activities under the supervision of medical officers and Postgraduate in Community Medicine. Medical Interns have to work in centre OPD, Rural Mobile Clinic, participate in school health education program and weekly academic program where we cover treatment guidelines and National Health Program. We did the analysis of Internship Cards submitted by 113 medical interns of 2007 batch, which is our second batch of recently graduated medical doctors. The findings are given below. We are in the process of making our internship program more relevant to the competencies required for the basic primary care physician.

Indicators for monitoring Rural Health Centre (113)
The total number of patients seen (Mean ± SD) 468.18 ±173.11
The total number of patients treated (Mean ± SD) 438 ± 170.10
Patients referred (Mean ± SD) 22.79 ± 17.95
Type of operative procedures
Suturing 50(44.25)
Clean and dressing 48(42.19)
Foreign body (ear) 1(0.89)
Trauma 46(40.71)
Health education in school and community 74(66.37)
Involvement in survey and project activity 15(13.27)

Interns’ academic activities are held at RHTC every afternoon. They are given the topic of standard treatment guidelines of common conditions developed by the ministry of health and family welfare, India, which are relevant to their day to day practice. The discussion was facilitated by faculties and post graduate from the Community Medicine department.

Training\seminars and capacity building sessions for medical interns
Sr. No Topics Presenter/facilitator
1 Management of Diabetes Medical interns and Dr. V. Murugan
2 Management of Hypertension
3 Management of Diarrhea
4 Management of ARI
5 National Malaria Drug Policy
6 Management of Nutritional Anemia
7 Management of dog bite
8 Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program
9 Personal hygiene among school children
10 Conflict management Dr Kalaiselvan G

Report on Activities related to Community Oriented Medical Education (COME), 2012

Introduction

In the present system of medical education in India, community orientation and practical exposure of medical undergraduates to the health care delivery system, field realities and community problems is lacking. In South East Asia and especially in India, there has been an increase in the number of medical schools implementing a community-oriented education program. Most medical schools experience difficulties providing the right quality and quantity of educational experiences due to lack of curricula to respond to the needs of the local community. We developed a needs based community-oriented education program for our undergraduates. Hence, the objective was to expose the third semester medical undergraduates to this program. In this process COME program was held between 6 – 10 August, 2011 at Eanathimangalam village situated in Villupuram district of Tamil Nadu served by our Rural Health Training Center (RHTC).

Method

107 students of second year MBBS were exposed to the COME program by the Department of Community Medicine, Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital, Puducherry, India. The program started with self introduction and briefing with the student about the importance of the program. The program was conducted as per the schedule mentioned in table 1. The students were divided into small groups and each group was guided by the faculty or post graduate. The students were introduced to the allotted family by the guide. The students collected demographic characteristics, identified the environmental risk factors and carried out personal hygiene for the family members of the allotted house using the format. The students also identified the family members suffering from acute and chronic medical problems. On the last day of the program medical camp was organized in the village to treat the acute medical condition. To ensure early clinical exposure, the students were asked to accompany the family members with medical problems to the medical camp and to observe the management by the treating doctor. Feedback in the form of retro-pre and open ended questions were obtained from the students on the final day. To know the perception of the community regarding the COME program, two Focus Group Discussion (FGD) (one each among men and women) was conducted in the village.

Results

In the analysis of retro-pre feedback questionnaire, post-exposure mean score for all the responses were highly significant (p<0.001). The three broad categories of common responses from the manual content analysis emerged from the open ended feedback: 1). I learned the problems of the people, 2). Acquaintance gained by attending the camp and 3). Opinion on doctors

The best thing about the program was ‘development of communication skills’ and ‘Time was very less’ was the barrier in this program as reflected from their feedback

Conclusion
Overall the program was well taken by the students and community

Medical camp at enathimangalam village following COME program:

A team of faculties, post graduates and medical interns conducted the health camp. Students identified health problems in the family members they visited and mobilized them to the camp. A total of 474 vilagers were examined and students provided health education about their illness.

School health education program

In order to promote health awareness among students, schools were identified in the villages of field practicing areas of RHTC. Every month on a particular topic health education and awareness was provided by a team of health educator, medical social worker, post graduate and medical interns. This activity helps generate awareness among students and in training medical interns.


Month Topic
January Nutrition and healthy lifestyle
February Awareness about cancer and prevention
March Knowledge about TB and modes of spread
April Malaria and modes of prevention
May Smoking and ill effects, substance abuse
June Keeping our environment clean
July Injury and first aid measures
August Breast feeding practices
September Personal hygiene
October Menstrual hygiene
November Prevention of rabies
December Awareness on AIDS

As a part of breast feeding week celebrations, we decided to conduct a one day workshop for first year students of auxiliary nurse midwife courses and offer them skills based training on –counselling the mother about importance of exclusive breastfeeding, show the mother how to position the child and attach the child to the breast and management of inverted breast nipples by using a disposable plastic syringe. We used an Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illnesses (IMNCI) guidelines which is recommended under the National Rural Health Mission. We could offer these skills-based training to 52 first year ANM students in surrounding two Para- medical schools. We used photographs, handouts and PowerPoint presentations. We also emphasized the importance of breast feeding week and its theme. We also emphasized the importance of Infant Milk Substitute, Feeding Bottles and Infant Foods (Regulation of Production, Supply and Distribution) act, 1992 as provided by MoHFW, India and distributed the hard copy of the circular to all. The sessions were conducted by faculty of the Community Medicine department and the other team member was a health educator from our department.

Material distributed: IMNCI guidelines on breastfeeding, pamphlets on breastfeeding week and IMS act, 1992.

Would activities organized have an impact on the people?

Yes, it addressed the training needs of the health care providers and in the long term it will benefit to the surrounding community. Training of health care providers is the most important upcoming issue

Research Activities

We aim to carry out context specific public health research of national relevance and research which will help us to improve our quality of services in our field practice area.

  1. One of our post-graduate had completed MD dissertation on ‘Acute childhood morbidities: determinants and household practices in surrounding villages of the Rural Health Training Centre, Thiruvanainallur’in surrounding three Primary Health Centres in Villupuram district. The findings of the study will help us to improve health care practices for sick children among rural mothers.
  2. One of our postgraduates had completed a study “An experience of initiating geriatric screening OPD at our Rural Health Training Centre of SMVMCH, Pondicherry” which was presented in the national IAPSM conference. The findings of the study are
  3. One of our faculty currently doing a study titled “An epidemiological study on animal bites in the field practicing areas of RHTC” which is being conducted among 18865 individuals in 34 villages. This study will help us in identifying practices of animal bites and in establishing an anti-rabies clinic in the RHTC.
  4. One of our postgraduates currently working on his thesis titled “Epidemiological study of dementia and caregivers' perspectives in the field care villages of rural health training center, thiruvenainallur”.
Field practice area for Rural Health Training Centre- 34 villages of Thiruvennainallur
Name of the village Population
Aaivari 1657
Alankuppam 1196
Arumpattu 1243
Athipattu 88
Barugampattu 993
C.anaivari 330
Chinnasevlai 1156
Chuthanangur 1527
Emappur 2673
Enathimangalam 3327
Eralur 1483
Ganthikuppam 2658
Kannarampattu 2054
Keerimedu 1574
Kiramam 2680
Madampattu 1237
Madinthur 1179
Maligamedu 243
Manamedu 393
Mazhaivampattu 1080
Mazhavarayanur 1986
Melamangalam 1513
Palayapattinam 238
Periyasevalai 6284
Samathuvapuram 183
Sarayamedu 285
Semmar 2320
Sirumadurai 2046
Siruvanur 3121
Sithalingamadam 5654
Thaduthatkondur 2533
Thenmangalam 1028
Thiruvennai nallur 7011
Valaiyampattu 948
Total 63921